Eames Lounge Chair and Otoman
Eames lounge chair in room

 

Eames Lounge Chair and ottoman

Name: Eames Lounge Chair and ottoman
Designer: Charles and Ray Eames
Date: 1956
Location: US
Category: Chair
Materials: Plywood, leather
Style / tradition: Modern
Sold by Herman Miller (United States)
 
Official website
Eames Lounge Chair and ottoman presentation
Eames Lounge Chair and ottoman product details
Official store
Eames Lounge Chair and ottoman store

Short description:
The Eames Lounge Chair and ottoman are furnishings made of molded plywood and leather, designed by Charles and Ray Eames for the Herman Miller furniture company. They are officially titled Eames Lounge (670) and Ottoman (671) and were released in 1956 after years of development by designers. It was the first chair that the Eameses designed for a high-end market.

The history of the design

In general Charles and Ray Eames aimed to develop furniture that could be mass-produced and affordable, with the exception of the Eames Lounge Chair. This luxury item was inspired by the traditional English Club Chair. The Eames Lounge Chair is an icon of Modern style design, although when it was first made, Ray Eames remarked in a letter to Charles that the chair looked “comfortable and un-designy”. Charles’s vision was for a chair with “the warm, receptive look of a well-used first baseman’s mitt.” The chair is composed of three curved plywood shells: the headrest, the backrest and the seat. In early production, beginning in 1956 and running through the very early 1990s, the shells were made up of five thin layers of plywood which were covered by a veneer of Brazilian rosewood. The use of Brazilian rosewood was discontinued in the early 1990s, and current production since then consists of seven layers of plywood covered by finishing veneers of cherry, walnut, Palisander rosewood (a sustainably grown wood with similar grain patterns to the original Brazilian versions), and other finishes.

Life and Interesting Facts
Charles Ormond Eames, Jr., (June 17, 1907 – August 21, 1978) was an American designer, architect and film maker. In creative partnership with his spouse Ray Kaiser Eames he is responsible for groundbreaking contributions in the field of architecture, furniture design, industrial design, manufacturing and the photographic arts.
Charles Eames was greatly influenced by the Finnish architect Eliel Saarinen (whose son Eero, also an architect and would become a partner and friend).
In 1941, Charles and Catherine divorced, and he married his Cranbrook colleague Bernice (“Ray”) Kaiser, who was born in Sacramento, California. He then moved with her to Los Angeles, California, where they worked and lived until their deaths. In the late 1940s, as part of the Arts & Architecture magazine’s “Case Study” program, the Eames designed and built the groundbreaking Eames House, Case Study House #8, as their home. Located upon a cliff overlooking the Pacific Ocean and hand-constructed within a matter of days entirely of pre-fabricated steel parts intended for industrial construction, it remains a milestone of modern architecture.
Ray Eames had a joyful and rigorous work ethic at the “Eames office”. She called it “shop”- a place where they worked and did early production work. At the office, they employed local people, war veterans, and housewives. Eames office was a diversified workplace. The Eameses also believed in “learning by doing”- before introducing a new idea at the Eames Office, Charles and Ray explored needs and constraints of the idea extensively.
Philosophy
Anything I can do, Ray can do better.[13]— Charles Eames
I never gave up painting, I just changed my palette.[13] — Ray Eames